Volume 6, Issue 1, March 2018, Page: 1-5
Qualitative and Quantitative Feasibility of Biogas Production from Kitchen Waste
Haftu Gebretsadik, Department of Chemistry, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Solomon Mulaw, Department of Chemistry, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Giday Gebregziabher, Department of Chemistry, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
Received: Sep. 10, 2017;       Accepted: Dec. 28, 2017;       Published: Mar. 7, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajee.20180601.11      View  1451      Downloads  69
Abstract
This study focuses on production of biogas from kitchen waste using modified digester. The digester has been placed in four different conditions. As the result shows, production of gas gradually increased and peaked to 0.360, 0.260, 0.150 and 0.116m3 at 9th, 12th, 17th and 23th days of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th sets respectively. Due to depletion of the developed culture and organic content of the waste, gas production becomes decreased and then nearly zero at 22th and 29th days of the 1st and 2nd sets. But For the last two cases production is not completed within thirty days. Finally, 10kg of food waste has been produced a total of 2.292, 1.783, 1.172 and 0.962m3 of biogas from the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th sets respectively and the best waste/water ratio is 1:2. Temperature, particle size and pH are the main factors affecting microbial activity and then methane production. Of those, temperature is the most important factor. Low pH decrease’s the biogas production by facilitating hydrolysis and acidogenesis reactions and makes bacteria’s to utilize the waste more readily. Generally, production of biogas in Shoarobit is more feasible, and takes short time than in Debre Berhan town.
Keywords
Anaerobic Digestion, Compact Bio-Digester, Particle Size, PH, Temperature
To cite this article
Haftu Gebretsadik, Solomon Mulaw, Giday Gebregziabher, Qualitative and Quantitative Feasibility of Biogas Production from Kitchen Waste, American Journal of Energy Engineering. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ajee.20180601.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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